About Phase-II of Grid Connected Rooftop Solar Programme

Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE), Government of India, launched the Phase-II of Grid Connected Rooftop Solar Programme that provides a subsidy for installing rooftop solar systems in August 2019. The programme is being implemented through electricity distribution companies and provides a subsidy for only household owner and Group Housing Societies to set up solar systems on the rooftop of their residence/residential campus. The Implementation arrangement of the programmes is divided into two components. Component A: Central Financial Assistance (CFA)* to Residential sector – 4 GW, under which: CFA @ 40% for capacity up to 3 kWp CFA @ 20% for capacity beyond 3 kWp and up to 10 kWp CFA @ 20% for GHS/RWA capacity up to 500 kWp (limited to 10 kWp per house and total upto 500 kWp) * CFA shall be on % of the benchmark cost of MNRE for the state/ UT or lowest of the costs discovered in the tenders for that state/ UT in that year, whichever is lower implementing agency: Power Distributing companies (DISCOMs) Component B: Incentives to DISCOMs – for an initial 18 GW Capacity, under which: The progressive incentive for Discoms for achievements above baseline (the cumulative RTS capacity installed at the end of the previous financial year). No incentives for capacity addition up to 10% 5% incentives for addition beyond 10% and up to 15% 10% incentives for addition beyond 15% Only domestic manufactured modules and Solar cells to be used under this programme to be eligible for […]

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What are the financial benefits to participating DISCOM?

Apart from some benefits like meeting the increasing power demand, the rooftop solar assists distribution companies balance their peak demand cycles during daytime and also reduces transmission and distribution (T&D) losses as the power is consumed at the point of generation. In addition to the above benefits, since DISCOM is required to incur additional expenditure for implementation of the programme in terms of implementation of tenders,  additional man-power, creating infrastructure, capacity building, awareness, etc., these will be compensated by providing service charges and performance-linked incentives, under the Phase-II Grid Connected Rooftop Solar and Small Power Plant programme of Government of India, as explained below. 1. A service charge of 3% of eligible Central Financial Assistance (CFA) for implementing the programme under Component-A of the scheme. The service charges will essentially cover but not be limited to the following: – demand aggregation activities, creation of working RTS cell in DISCOM bid process management program implementation availability and streamlining the process of net-metering /billing inspection, monitoring, development of online portal training of DISCOM officials awareness programs for the proliferation of rooftop solar PV projects creation and operating project management cell in MNRE etc. 2. An incentive for each MWp capacity of solar rooftop, added by DISCOM in their distribution area over and above 10% of base capacity installed at the end of the previous year. The incentives will be given on incremental rooftop solar capacity installed by the DISCOM in their distribution area from the installed base capacity* (at the end of the previous financial year) […]

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How can DISCOMs participate in the GCRT Phase-II Programme?

All Government-owned and private DISCOMs in India is eligible to participate and take benefits of the programme. MNRE will allocate capacity for installation of the rooftop solar system in the residential sector by DISCOM in the ensuing year. One of the parameters for allocating the capacity will be the demand raised by the DISCOM and capacity required for the fulfilment of solar RPO of the State as notified by the Ministry of Power. For this, DISCOM is required to submit a yearly online proposal to MNRE via the SPIN portal at www.solarrooftop.gov.in . The user manual on how to create an account and use SPIN Portal ‘DISCOM Help document’ is available here. Please note that the online proposal submission is mandatory to participate in the programme.   The post ID for this chapter is 3490. For any suggestion or comment regarding the content, you may write to us at faqs[dot]solar[at]gmail[dot]com. Please quote the post ID in the subject, for better assistance.  

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Why is there a need for transition towards renewable energy?

With the increasing awareness among the general population, there has been a positive effect in the uptake of renewable energy. (Some of the reasons given below.) When renewable sources, such as sunlight, wind, tides, waves, and geothermal heat are harnessed,  they can produce electricity, heating and cooling and various energy services. The progress in the renewable energy technologies has given greater access to the rural and remote areas to sustainable and clean energy at reduced costs and healthier lives. Some reasons for transitioning from fossil fuels to renewable energy are: Not all renewable sources are devoid of problems (example: hydro power)

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Selection of vendors and discovery of rates by DISCOM

Once the proposal submitted by DISCOM on SPIN portal is accepted and approved, a capacity sanction is issued by MNRE, under which the project commissioning timeline shall be fifteen months from the date of sanction. Empanelment of Vendors s the programme is very new, DISCOMs may also utilize the existing infrastructure of State Nodal Agencies (SNA) or may also implement the program through SNAs. In such cases, service charges may be appropriately divided between the two agencies. However, projects would be sanctioned to DISCOM only and SNA would be acting as the supporting agencies for DISCOM. The point of contact for MNRE in the case may be, will always be DISCOM. DISCOM or its authorised agency are required to invite Expression of Interest/Public Tender for empanelment of agencies/vendors and discover the rate for the installation of rooftop solar systems for eligible consumers under the jurisdiction of the DISCOM. The selected bidder is required to follow the quality control orders and standards for all components of the RTS system and its installation as per MNRE Guidelines. DISCOM may enure that state regulations and policies adhere in the public tender. Cost to Beneficiary The beneficiary/ DISCOM eligible consumer will have the option of installing RTS system through any of these empanelled vendors at net of CFA amount i.e. making payment to the vendors after deducting the eligible CFA amount. The vendor will claim the CFA from the DISCOM. The CFA for the residential sector is permissible only if domestic manufactured Solar PV […]

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Lesson-3

The goal of this lesson is to provide information about the administrative procedures pertaining to the Operational Guidelines of Grid Connected Rooftop and Small Solar Power Plant Programme Phase-II of Ministry of New and Renewable Energy, Government of India. The lesson will cover the following: Scope of GCRT Programme- Phase II How can a DISCOM apply for the programme? Roles and responsibilities of stakeholders Suggestive Operating Procedures for Installation and Metering Connection Project Closure Requirements

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India Electricity Generation by Type

India is one of the fastest-growing major economies in the world and its role is vital in the global energy markets. Over the years, the Government of India has been striving plans to produce 175 GW of renewable energy by 2022; the rise in the uptake of renewable energy through energy market reforms and the amount of renewable electricity deployment has increased citizens’ access to electricity. The comparative pie-charts below shows India’s progress and its future projection:    

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What are the components of a Solar PV System?

Listed below are some of the basic components that are assembled to build a solar PV power plant that is safe to operate and generates energy to its maximum efficiency if designed and installed correctly. Scroll down to read about each component seen above: PV Modules: PV stands for Photo Voltaic. As these panels convert light (i.e. photo) into electrical power (voltage), so they are known as Photovoltaic modules. Most commonly available PV modules are of two types- Crystalline and thin-film. PV modules are given output ratings in watts (Wp). PV Module Mounting Structures: Module mounting structures (also called MMS) is used to fix PV modules on surfaces like roofs, building facades, or the ground. MMS is commonly made of three types of materials i.e. Hot Dip Galvanized Iron, Aluminium or Mild Steel (MS). Structure Foundation: Foundation or support of any structure is of utmost importance for fixation of any structure. Similarly, the PV module mounting structure foundation plays a vital role and is designed with reference to the existing soil/roof condition in order to withstand wind speed of the location depending on the type of PV installation i.e. rooftop or ground mount. Inverter: Inverter is the brain of a solar power system and serves primarily two purposes: To convert the DC power generated from Solar Panels into AC power; To ensure that generated solar energy is used at priority over grid supply. Solar inverters are essentially Grid-tied or Off-Grid/Hybrid. Junction Box: Often called as JB,  junction box i.e. AC […]

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Photovoltaic modules, its types, assembly and performance characteristics

What is a PV Module? A Photovoltaic (PV) module which is generally termed as a solar panel is an assembly of photovoltaic cells electrically connected to each other and mounted on a laminated frame. The solar cells are primarily made up of silicon material which absorbs the photons emitted by the sun. PV modules are given output ratings in watts (Wp). Types of PV Modules There are three major types of solar PV modules. Mono-crystalline Poly-crystalline (also known as multi-crystalline) Thin-film Each solar PV module type has its own unique features. These PV modules also vary based on how they’re manufactured, their appearance, performance, costs each are best suited for. Mono-crystalline and Poly-crystalline solar PV modules Both mono-crystalline and poly-crystalline solar PV modules have cells made of silicon wafers. To build a mono-crystalline or poly-crystalline module, wafers are assembled into rows and columns covered with a glass sheet, and framed together. Poly-crystalline cells are square-shaped whereas mono-crystalline cells are square with missing corners. While both of these types of solar PV modules have cells made from silicon, mono-crystalline and poly-crystalline modules vary in the composition of the silicon itself. Mono-crystalline solar cells are cut from a single, pure crystal of silicon. Alternatively, poly-crystalline solar cells are composed of fragments of silicon crystals that are melted together in a mold before being cut into wafers. Mono-crystalline modules typically have the highest efficiencies and power capacity. Thin-film solar PV modules Unlike mono-crystalline and poly-crystalline solar PV modules, thin-film modules are made from […]

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Module Mounting Structure (MMS) Design and Material

Several design elements are involved in the setting up of an efficient solar PV power plant and among them is the Module mounting structure (MMS) that withholds the heart i.e. PV modules over its lifetime.MMS allows the PV modules to be held firmly to the surface of installation (can be a roof of groud), capable of battling strong winds that could, without the careful design can damage the entire installation. MMS also becomes highly important as the generation of PV modules depend on the right tilt angle on which it is to be installed in order to raise the overall efficiency and generation capabilities of the PV power plant and this positioning based on geographical location is not possible without having a right MMS design. MMS Design Considerations Generally, module mounting structures are of three types: Hot Dip Galvanized Iron (GI) Aluminium Mild Steel (MS) Some of the design considerations to be taken care off for the construction/Installation of MMS are as follows: Comply with the applicable structural, building code and safety requirements. Meet standards and module manufacturer’s mounting requirements. Enhance array performance – allowing airflow to minimize operating temperature Provide reasonable accessibility for installation and maintenance Make the system aesthetically appropriate for the site and application. Thermal aspects – to allow expansion/contraction of modules/ structure Wind – shall be rated for the maximum expected wind speeds Material accumulation on PV array – Snow, ice, or dust Corrosion – corrosion resistant materials suitable for the lifetime and duty of the […]

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